PATIENTS’ EXPERIENCES OF A MOBILE PHONE TEXT MESSAGE INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE DIETARY BEHAVIOURS IN HAEMODIALYSIS (KIDNEYTEXT)

J DAWSON1,2,3, A TONG1,4, A MATUS-GONZALEZ1, K L. CAMPBELL5, J C. CRAIG6, V W. LEE1,2,7

1Centre For Kidney Research, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, 2Westmead Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, St George Hospital, Sydney, Australia, 4Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 5Healthcare Excellence and Innovation, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, Australia, 6College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia, 7Department of Renal Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia

Aim: To describe the perspectives of people receiving haemodialysis regarding satisfaction and acceptability of a mobile phone text messaging intervention (KIDNEYTEXT).
Background: Novel interventions are needed to improve people’s adherence to complex renal dietary recommendations. Evaluating the acceptability of an intervention is a key component of determining feasibility.
Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 patients receiving haemodialysis who had been randomised to the intervention arm of the KIDNEYTEXT trial. Transcripts were analysed thematically. KIDNEYTEXT trial registration – ACTRN12617001084370.
Results: We identified four major themes: building awareness (reinforcement of information, simple and comprehensible, guiding choices, accessible information, gaining skills in management), valuing care (boosting self-esteem, in-person care bolstered by reminders), activating change (adjusting lifestyle, gaining control of electrolytes and fluid, striving to improve overall health), waning attention and motivation (lack of personalisation limiting change, maintaining the status quo, reverting back to old habits).
Conclusion: The KIDNEYTEXT intervention was acceptable to participants. Participants appreciated the simple and actionable content and the frequent reminders of how to improve their diet. They felt that the mobile phone text messages increased contact and reinforced dietary counselling. Future trials should consider strategies to enhance personalisation to further motivate dietary change.


Biography:
Jess is a PhD candidate and renal dietitian with over 10 years clinical experience. Jess’s goal is to combine her clinical practice with innovative research in nutritional management to improve care and outcomes in people with chronic kidney disease. Jess’ PhD is evaluating the impact of eHealth interventions to improve dietary care in people with chronic kidney disease.

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