https://anzsnasm.com 57th ANZSN ASM 2022 Wed, 08 Sep 2021 03:56:51 +0000 en-AU hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.8 /wp-content/uploads/2020/09/cropped-ANZSN_logo-1-32x32.png https://anzsnasm.com 32 32 BRUCE MORRISON PRIZE https://anzsnasm.com/13990 Mon, 06 Sep 2021 01:07:38 +0000 https://www.anzsnasm.com/?p=13990 BRUCE MORRISON PRIZE
The Bruce Morrison prize is awarded to the renal trainee that delivers the best research, audit, clinical case(s) or similar renal relevant topic. This prestigious award will be awarded to the presenter with the best topic, content, thought, discussion and presentation. Dr Bruce Morrison was a co-founder of renal medicine in New Zealand; working in Wellington Renal Unit. This Award is made in honour of the late Dr Bruce Morrison for his outstanding contribution to Nephrology in Aotearoa New Zealand. 

New Zealand Renal Trainees are encouraged to present at this year’s ANZSN meeting in Auckland, Saturday 30 October. Trainees are required to submit an abstract of no more than 250 words to be considered for the prize. The top ranked abstracts will be included in the program and will be required to present a 15 minute oral presentation at the meeting. Each presentation will be followed by 5 minutes question and discussion time with the session chair.

PRIZE
The prize is $500 cash.

SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT
Abstracts should be forwarded to the following email: tina.sun@middlemore.co.nz

ELIGIBILITY
Applicants must be a financial member of the ANZSN at the date of abstract closing. 

Applicants must be working full time as a RACP Nephrology Advanced Trainee in a clinical role.  Trainees are ineligible for the Award once RACP Fellowship is confirmed.

Only those Award applicants who attend the ANZSN Aotearoa New Zealand Annual Meeting and, if shortlisted, make an oral presentation at the dedicated Bruce Morrison Award session, will be considered eligible for the Award.

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David Harris https://anzsnasm.com/13835 Wed, 18 Aug 2021 23:44:15 +0000 https://www.anzsnasm.com/?p=13835

Professor David Harris AM, MD, MB.BS, FRACP

David Harris is Professor of Medicine at The University of Sydney, Director of Nephrology and Dialysis in the Western Sydney Renal Service, and Director of the Renal Failure Laboratory in the Centre for Transplantation and Renal Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research.

He is Past-President of the International Society of Nephrology, Past-President of the Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology and Past-President of the Australian & New Zealand Society of Nephrology. Recent awards include Member of the Order of Australia (2019), Richard Yu Award of the Hong Kong Society of Nephrology (2017), Honorary Membership of the Japanese Society of Nephrology (2017), Westmead Institute Award for Scientific Excellence (2017 & 2016), Distinguished Professorial Award (Sydney University, 2016), Associé Etranger in the 1st Division of the French Academy of Medicine (2016), Medical Staff Council Award for contributions to Westmead Hospital (2016) and the Priscilla Kincaid-Smith Medal for outstanding clinical and scientific achievement in research into treatment of diseases of kidney & urinary tract (2012).

Other recent positions include Board member of KDIGO, Board member of Kidney Health Australia, Chair of the Advisory Board of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network, Chair of the Medical Staff Council of Westmead Hospital and Editor in chief of Nephrology.

He has published more than 380 papers, and given more than 270 invited national and international presentations. His major clinical and research interests include progressive CKD and dialysis, and his laboratory interests are focussed on pathogenesis of and novel therapies for progressive CKD.

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Tatyana Chtanova https://anzsnasm.com/13820 Wed, 18 Aug 2021 07:03:40 +0000 https://www.anzsnasm.com/?p=13820 Head of the Innate and Tumour Immunology Lab, Garvan Institute

Dr Tatyana Chtanova is the head of the Innate and Tumour Immunology lab at the Garvan Institute in Sydney.  After undergraduate studies at the University of New South Wales, Dr Chtanova was awarded her PhD in 2005 for her thesis work on specific gene expression signatures for novel T cell subsets, performed at the Garvan Institute.

Following her PhD, Tatyana was awarded the Human Frontier Science Program Fellowship to train at the University of California, Berkeley. During her fellowship she gained expertise in in vivo two-photon microscopy and applied it to uncover a unique neutrophil response to inflammation called neutrophil swarming and a novel mechanism of immune evasion by pathogens.

Dr Chtanova returned to the Garvan Institute to establish her research laboratory in 2009. Tatyana’s main research interest is immune cell migration and function in cancer and infection. Her group is especially interested in developing non-invasive approaches such as two-photon microscopy and in situ photoconversion to visualise and track immune cells in vivo. This talk will focus on our recent insights into the role of innate immune cells in inflammation, infection and cancer obtained using intravital imaging.

 

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Matthew Pickering https://anzsnasm.com/13797 Sun, 15 Aug 2021 23:47:36 +0000 https://www.anzsnasm.com/?p=13797 Director, Centre for Inflammatory Disease, Imperial College

My expertise is on the role of the complement system in health and disease. I am a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellow in Clinical Science and my research has been funded by the Wellcome since 2003. My research utilises the genetic characterization of families with complement-mediated renal disease, the in vitro studies of complement regulatory proteins and the generation of unique models of complement-mediated kidney disease. My clinical interests include systemic lupus erythematous, complement deficiency states and C3 glomerulopathy. I am a Professor of Rheumatology at Imperial College where I lead the Centre for Inflammatory Disease (https://www.imperial.ac.uk/immunology-inflammation/research/cid/). I am an Honorary Consultant Rheumatologist at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and the Academic Director of the Imperial Lupus Centre.

I had the honour and pleasure to supervise Dr Tom Barbour’s PhD and have wonderful memories of our time working together in London. It is therefore a particularly emotional moment for me to give my talk in a symposium dedicated to Tom. He is very much missed by all of us in the complement team here.

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Dominique Martin https://anzsnasm.com/13772 Tue, 10 Aug 2021 01:09:47 +0000 https://www.anzsnasm.com/?p=13772 A/Prof Dominique E Martin, MBBS, BA(Hons), PhD (Applied Ethics) 

Dominique leads the ethics and professionalism team in the School of Medicine at Deakin University in  Australia, where she is involved in teaching and research. Her research currently focuses on ethical issues in nephrology and in procurement, use, and distribution of organs and tissues for transplantation.

Dominique is a past co-chair of the Custodian Group of the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism and of the Ethics Committee of The Transplantation Society. She served on the Organ and Tissue Working Committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, and has worked as an ethics consultant to the World Health Organization, the Qatar Organ Donation Center, and the Australian Organ and Tissue Authority. Dominique is an Associate Editor of Transplantation and a member of the ASN-ERA-EDTA-ISN Joint Working Group on Ethical issues in Nephrology.

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ERYTHROPOIESIS-STIMULATING AGENTS FOR ANAEMIA IN ADULTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE: AN UPDATED COCHRANE NETWORK META-ANALYSIS https://anzsnasm.com/13348 Wed, 07 Jul 2021 01:11:15 +0000 https://anzsnasm.com/?p=13348 Dr Edmund Chung1, Prof Suetonia Palmer2, Prof Giovanni Strippoli3,4,5

1Cochrane Kidney and Transplant, Centre For Kidney Research, Westmead, Australia, 2University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand, 3University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 4Cochrane Kidney and Transplant, Centre for Kidney Research, Westmead, Australia, 5School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Camperdown, Australia

Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) against each other to treat anaemia in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Background: Several ESAs are available to treat CKD-related anaemia but whether they have different effects on patient outcomes compared to placebo or each other is uncertain.

Methods:  We did a Cochrane review with network meta-analysis. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Register until January 2021 for randomised controlled trials evaluating ESAs in adults with CKD. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool. Data synthesis was performed using random effects meta-analysis. We assessed evidence certainty for the primary outcomes (blood transfusions and all-cause death) using GRADE. We also assessed secondary outcomes (fatigue, breathlessness, cardiovascular events and kidney failure).

Results: 117 studies (n=24,998) proved eligible. The effects on preventing blood transfusion or all-cause death were uncertain for any ESA compared to another ESA, in low to very low-certainty evidence. Compared to placebo for preventing blood transfusion, epoetin alfa (odds ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.61, low-certainty evidence), epoetin beta (0.19, 0.08-0.47, low-certainty evidence), and darbepoetin alfa (0.27, 0.11-0.67, moderate-certainty evidence) were superior, though effects for methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta, biosimilar epoetin and biosimilar darbepoetin alfa were uncertain, in very low-certainty evidence. Compared to placebo for all-cause cause death, darbepoetin alfa probably had similar effects, in moderate-certainty evidence and other ESAs had uncertain effects, in low to very low-certainty evidence. It was uncertain whether ESAs had different effects on cardiovascular events, kidney failure, and breathlessness compared to another ESA. Data for fatigue were absent.

Conclusions: Different ESAs have similar or uncertain effects on blood transfusion, all-cause death, cardiovascular events, and breathlessness.


Biography:

Edmund is an adult nephrologist with a strong interest in glomerulonephritis and identifying strategies to limit the progression of chronic kidney disease. He completed a BMed MD at UNSW, MMed (Clin Epi) at The University of Sydney, and has worked with the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Group on multiple systematic reviews to apply best evidence-based practice to his patients. He is currently undertaking a PhD with Prof Steven Alexander at the Centre for Kidney Research on regulatory T cells and other immunotherapies in primary membranous nephropathy with the goal of translating novel efficacious and less toxic treatments into clinical care.

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ESTABLISHING A CORE OUTCOME MEASURE FOR PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: A CONSENSUS WORKSHOP REPORT https://anzsnasm.com/13290 Thu, 01 Jul 2021 02:55:45 +0000 https://anzsnasm.com/?p=13290 P NATALE1,2, R  PERRONE3, A TONG1,  T  HARRIS4 E HANNAN1, A JU1, E  BURNETTE5, N  CASTELEIJN6, A CHAPMAN7, S EASTTY5,  R GANSEVOORT6, M  HORIE8, S  HORIE9, B  KNEBELMANN10, R  LEE11, R MUSTAFA12, R SANDFORD13, A BAUMGART1, J CRAIG14, G  RANGAN15, B SAUTENET16, A VIECELLI17, N AMIR1, N EVANGELIDIS1, C GUHA1, C LOGEMAN1, K  MANERA1, A MATUS GONZALEZ1, M HOWELL1, G  STRIPPOLI1,2, Y  CHO17

1University Of Sydney, , Australia, 2University of Bari, , Italy, 3Tufts University School of Medicine, , United States, 4Polycystic Kidney Disease International, , United Kingdom, 5United Kingdom, , United Kingdom, 6University Medical Centre Groningen, , The Netherlands, 7University of Chicago, , United States, 8Mayo Clinic, , United States, 9Juntendo University, , Japan, 10Université de Paris APHP, , France, 11Australia, , Australia, 12University of Kansas, , United States, 13University of Cambridge, , United Kingdom, 14Flinders University, , Australia, 15Westmead Institute for Medical Research, , Australia, 16Université de Nantes, , France, 17University of Queensland, , Australia

Aim: An on online international workshop was conducted to discuss the identification or development of a core outcome measure for pain

Background: Pain is the highest prioritized patient-reported outcome in people with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) but remains infrequently and inconsistently measured across trials.

Methods: We convened an international Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology – Polycystic Kidney Disease (SONG-PKD) consensus workshop involving 21 patients/caregivers and 40 health professionals (clinicians, nurses, researchers, policy makers, and industry representatives) from 18 countries

Results: 118 studies, we identified 26 measures: 12 (46%) measures were developed for a non-ADPKD population, 1 (4%) for chronic kidney disease, 2 (8%) for polycystic liver disease and 11 (42%) specifically for ADPKD. Ten anatomical sites were included, with the lower back the most common (10 measures [39%]), four measurement dimensions (intensity (23 [88%]), frequency (3 [12%]), temporality (2 [8%]), and sensory (21 [81%]), two pain types, nociceptive including visceral (15 [58%]) and somatic (5 [20%]), and neuropathic (2 [8%]), and twelve impact dimensions, where the most frequent was work (5 [31%]). The validation data for the measures were variable and only the ADPKD Impact Scale reported all psychometric domains.

Conclusions:

Four themes were identified highlighting core issues related to measurement of pain in ADPKD: distressing and disrupting life participation, variability and ambiguity in defining pain, stigma, frustration and adaptation to pain, and ensuring validity and feasibility of pain measures.

Conclusions: Currently existing measures were found to be insufficient in capturing pain as a core outcome and need for a new validated measure was identified. A core outcome measure that is simple, succinct, and addresses the impact of pain on life participation may help to improve the measurement of pain in all trials to guide decision-making in people with ADPKD.


Biography:

Patrizia Natale, Research Associate, has completed an MSc in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Sydney, and a bachelor’s degree in Pharmacy. Patrizia is a researcher at the Centre of Kidney Research at the University of Sydney, and she has experience in Cochrane Systematic Reviews in patients with all stages of CKD (including patients undergoing dialysis and kidney transplant recipients), and in the design and conduct of randomized controlled trials and long-term cohort studies. She has completed the PhD in nephrology and kidney transplantation at the University of Bari, Italy.

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A STANDARDISED ASSESSMENT PROCESS TO IMPROVE NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT IN HAEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS https://anzsnasm.com/13256 Wed, 30 Jun 2021 04:56:24 +0000 https://anzsnasm.com/?p=13256 J STOCKINGS 1

1Hunter New England Health, Charlestown, Australia

Background: The prevalence of malnutrition in patients receiving Haemodialysis is between 28-54%, and is strongly associated with mortality. The KDOQI Clinical Practice Guideline recommends the regular use of the 7-point Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) tool to assess nutritional status in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease. An audit of our clinical service demonstrated that an SGA was administered in only 25% of patients. This was documented in a digital medical record that was not accessed by the multi-disciplinary team. We also found that some patients were not being referred despite being malnourished on assessment.

Aim: To improve the identification and management of malnutrition in patients receiving haemodialysis

Methods: A standardised dietetic assessment form was developed and implemented. This form comprised of a 7 point SGA and other key components of nutritional assessment including medical and social history, medications, anthropometry, biochemistry,nutrition related symptoms and dietary intake. The form was completed and filed in the dialysis medical file.

Results: Eighteen months post implementation of the standardised form, 89% of patients had a 7 point SGA completed.  Subsequently, the prevalence of malnutrition in our patient cohort had decreased to 11% (from 15%). Referrals increased by 50% and patient review wait time reduced.  This result was likely due to routine assessment by Dietitians and an increase in awareness of the nutritional intervention and issues due to enhanced communication with the multidisciplinary team. .

Conclusion: The use of a standardised form was effective in improving the identification of malnutrition, reducing referral wait time and improving staff referrals to the dietetic service.

 


Biography:

Bio to come.

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A RARE CAUSE OF MULTIPLE RENAL ANGIOMYOLIPOMAS IN AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL https://anzsnasm.com/13024 Fri, 28 May 2021 06:40:00 +0000 https://anzsnasm.com/?p=13024 J WEI 1, S CHATURVEDI 2,3

1Queensland Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, 2Department of Paediatrics, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Australia, 3Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia

Background: Angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are the most common benign kidney tumours. The majority (80-90%) occur sporadically as solitary lesions with female predominance and are diagnosed incidentally in adulthood. The remaining 10-20% of kidney AML’s are associated with underlying genetic conditions and present earlier, are larger, and are often multifocal. The vast majority of these are associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) but have also been reported more rarely in cases of neurofibromatosis type 1 and von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL).

Case report: We describe the case of an 11-year-old girl of Indian descent who was found to have multiple, unilateral kidney AMLs measuring up to 1.1 cm after an ultrasound for the investigation of recurrent urinary tract infections. Despite unremarkable family history, molecular microarray testing revealed a pathogenic 305 kb interstitial deletion at chromosome 3p25.3 involving the VHL gene, thus confirming the diagnosis of VHL. The patient underwent further workup with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spine, audiology, ophthalmology review and plasma metanephrines.. These were normal. Genetic counselling was provided to the family, and ongoing regular tumour surveillance arranged for the patient.

Conclusions: The presence of multiple or large AMLs in the paediatric age group should prompt further investigation for associated conditions; in this case leading to a diagnosis of VHL.

VHL is an autosomal dominant neoplastic syndrome characterized by central nervous system and retinal hemangioblastomas; renal cysts and clear cell renal cell carcinoma; phaeochromocytoma; and other neoplasms. Management of VHL centers around early detection and management of associated lesions to reduce morbidity in the patient, as well as genetic counselling and testing for family members.

 


Biography:

Jou Wei is a paediatric registrar from Brisbane, Queensland. He is currently based at the Queensland Children’s Hospital, and has completed training in multiple regional centres in Queensland as well as Darwin, Northern Territory. Jou has a special interest in public health and health equity in under-resourced populations. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, camping, and a good Netflix binge.

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ACCESS TO DECEASED DONOR KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION IN OLDER PATIENTS TREATED WITH MAINTENANCE DIALYSIS https://anzsnasm.com/13021 Fri, 28 May 2021 06:34:42 +0000 https://anzsnasm.com/?p=13021 S SO 1,2, AU E1,2,3, LEE V1,2, LIM W4,5, WONG G1,2,3

1Department of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Australia, 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 3Centre for Kidney Research, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, Australia, 4Department of Renal Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia, 5Medical School, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia

Aim: To determine the factors associated with waitlisting and deceased donor kidney transplantation in a cohort of older patients treated with dialysis.

Background: Older patients have higher incidence of kidney failure, but lower rates of transplantation compared to their younger counterparts.

Methods: Multivariable Cox regression modelling was used to determine the factors associated with waitlisting and subsequent transplantation in a cohort of patients who commenced dialysis aged ≥65 years between June 2006-December 2016.

Results: Of the 17,704 older patients, 612 (3.5%) were listed and followed for 3227 patient-years. Of these, 136 (22.2%) died and 387 (63.2%) received a deceased donor kidney transplant. Median time from waitlisting to transplant was 5.3 (IQR 2.0-16.7) months. Factors associated with increased likelihood of waitlisting [adjusted HR (95%)] were peritoneal dialysis as initial kidney replacement therapy [1.25 (1.05-1.48), recent era of dialysis commencement [1.15 (1.13-1.18)] and patients residing in SA [1.52 (1.12-2.06)]. Those with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), older age (per year increase) and diabetes mellitus were less likely to be listed [0.76 (0.58-0.99), 0.97 (0.93-1.00), 0.76 (0.57-0.99)]. Once on the list, higher SES [1.69 (1.20-2.39) – highest compared to lowest quintile], recent era of listing [1.19 (1.14-1.24)], longer duration on dialysis (per month) [1.02 (1.02-1.03)] and had PVD [1.43 (1.01-2.01)] were each associated with a higher probability of receiving a deceased donor transplant. Older patients residing in NSW and Vic were less likely to receive a transplant compared to the other States [0.36 (0.26-0.49), 0.36 (0.27-0.49].

Conclusions: Apart from known factors such as comorbidities that govern transplant candidacy, the observed disparity in access to deceased donor kidney transplantation in older dialysis patients are driven by socioeconomic and geographical factors.

 


Biography:

Dr Sarah So is a nephrologist and final-year palliative care advanced trainee, trained primarily in Western and South-western Sydney. Her areas of interest are in symptom control and quality of life in kidney disease managed without dialysis, and management of chronic kidney disease in the elderly.

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